Raspberry Lamingtons

Susan, AKA Kiwicook
Susan, AKA Kiwicook

Susan, AKA Kiwicook

In her days as a recipe developer, Susan has created over 450 recipes. Her Dutch and New Zealander roots serve as a basis for her culinary inspiration.

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Raspberry lamingtons

For the May challenge Marcellina from Marcellina in Cucina dared us to make Lamingtons. An Australian delicacy that is as tasty as it is elegant.

Question: Is there anything so good as a fresh lamington? Answer: Absolutely, flippin’ not! For us New Zealanders, lamingtons are about as Kiwi as you can get. The fact that they apparently originated in Aussie is neither here nor there. So when The Daring Kitchen challenged us to make lamingtons, I was stoked.

If you don’t know what lamingtons are (and that’s quite possible if you live outside of Australasia), they’re light-as-air sponge cakes coated in either chocolate icing or raspberry jelly, then rolled in coconut. Interestingly, while Aussies tend to prefer their lamingtons chocolate coated, we New Zealanders have always prefers ours coated in raspberry jelly with cream in the middle – not sure why… just always been that way. So, while most of the other Daring Kitchen members went the chocolate route, I stuck to raspberry, the Kiwi favourite.

What’s absolutely super about this recipe (well… I’ve given two recipes here, but I’ll explain that in a mo), is that it’s gluten-free! Yep, no wheat flour in sight, which can’t be said of all lamington recipes. Cornflour (or corn starch) is the flour of choice here and believe me, it makes all the difference!

Okay, so onto explaining why on earth I’m offering two recipes. Well… the first one is the one The Daring Kitchen provided; the second one (the alternative recipe) is actually the one I used. Why did I go and make life complicated? It’s because I was looking at another raspberry lamington recipe online and in the reviewer’s comments below it, I noted a very bold statement from a blogger saying that the recipe he used (which he duly noted) was THE BEST recipe out there! How could I possibly resist?

So, despite minimal instructions, I characteristically plunged in and well… as you can see from the images, the results were indeed fabulous. The issue with the recipe though was that I had to do a fair bit of guesswork and a few adaptations and I’m not really confident about recommending it – the only reason I’ve included it is that I’d like to try it again, so it’s a record for me really. But, if you like the look of it (and basically the big difference is that it beats the egg whites separately), I’ve since tracked down this recipe from Tradeaid in New Zealand which is almost identical.

Right, with that painfully long explanation out of the way, all that’s left to say is… if you haven’t tried lamingtons before, you are in for a right royal treat. Frankly, I could easily give all other cakes away and just eat lamingtons for the rest of my life… strange, but true. Enjoy!

Raspberry lamingtons

Raspberry Lamingtons

This gluten-free treat features airy sponge cakes dipped in raspberry jelly and rolled in coconut, embodying the essence of the Australasian dessert tradition. A burst of flavor in every bite, making them a perfect treat for any occasion.
5 from 11 votes
Prep Time 30 minutes
Cook Time 40 minutes
Total Time 1 hour 10 minutes
Course Dessert
Servings 24 servings
Calories 134 kcal

Ingredients
 
 

For the sponge:

  • 5 large eggs at room temperature
  • 1 cup castor (superfine) sugar
  • Pinch salt
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • 1 ¼ cup cornflour (cornstarch)
  • 1 ½ tsp baking powder
  • 1 tbsp butter melted (optional)

For the raspberry coating:

  • 1 packet raspberry jelly
  • 1 cup boiling water
  • 2 cups dessicated coconut
  • 3/4 cup cream whipped

FOR ALTERNATIVE SPONGE RECIPE:

  • 4 large eggs separated
  • 3/4 cup sugar
  • 1 tsp baking soda
  • 1 cup cornflour (corn starch)
  • 2 tbsp custard powder
  • 1 tsp cream of tartar

Instructions
 

For the sponge:

  • Preheat oven to moderate 180°C/350°F.
  • Prepare a 4 ½ cm (1¾ inch) deep, 23cm x 33cm (9”x 13”) baking pan by greasing and lining with non-stick paper. Note: Lamington pans (or sponge roll pans) come in various sizes – so don’t worry if yours differs a little in terms of measurements. If you don’t have a lamington pan, you can use a square cake pan, but be aware the baking time may change – I used a 20cm (8 inch) deep sided square cake tin which gave me lovely tall lamingtons but took about double the amount of time to bake. 
  • In a stand mixer bowl place eggs, sugar and salt. Using the whisk attachment, beat on high for 15 minutes.
  • While the eggs and sugar are beating sift the cornflour and baking powder at least 3 times.
  • After 15 minutes add vanilla and beat on high for another 5 minutes. The mixture should have at least tripled in size, be light in colour and very foamy.
  • Sift flour mixture over the egg mixture. Use a large metal spoon to lightly fold the flour in (be very gentle!). If you are using butter, thoroughly fold it in now but lightly.
  • Spread mixture into your prepared pan and smooth out evenly.
  • Bake in preheated moderate oven for 22-25 minutes. The sponge will rise quite a lot but then settle back down. Don’t be tempted to open the oven to peak. When baked the sponge will have shrunk very slightly from the sides and should feel springy when pressed gently.
  • Turn the sponge out immediately onto a wire rack to cool and reverse sponge so as not to mark the top. Allow to cool.* Once cool, you can trim the crusts if you think they’re a bit tough and then cut the sponge into approx. 5 cm squares (if you find the cake hard to slice, try putting it briefly into the freezer to firm it up).

For the raspberry coating

  • Make the raspberry jelly by combing 1 packet of jelly with 1 cup boiling water in a medium sized heat resistant bowl. Allow to cool and partially set, but it should still be pourable.
  • Using a couple of forks, dip sponge squares (one at a time) into jelly and set on a wire rack, side by side, so that any excess jelly can drain off.
  • Put the coconut into a bowl or dish. Using the two forks again, dip each sponge square into the bowl of coconut and roll around until coated (alternatively, you can hold the lamington above the bowl of coconut and spoon the coconut over it). Put the lamingtons back onto the wire rack to set fully.**
  • Cut the lamingtons almost in half and fill with whipped cream. You can even dollop a small amount of raspberry jam in with the cream as well.

ALTERNATIVE SPONGE RECIPE:

  • Preheat oven to moderate 180°C/350°F.
  • Prepare a standard lamington or sponge roll tin by greasing and lining with non-stick paper. Note: Lamington pans (or sponge roll pans) come in various sizes – so don’t worry if yours differs a little in terms of measurements. If you don’t have a lamington pan, you can use a square cake pan, but be aware the baking time may change – I used a 20cm (8 inch) deep sided square cake tin which gave me lovely tall lamingtons but took about double the amount of time to bake. 
  • Sift the baking soda, cornflour and custard powder three times and set aside.
  • Beat egg whites until they reach soft peaks. Gradually add the sugar a tablespoon at a time and beat until the mixture is stiff and no longer gritty. Then add the yolks one at a time and beat for a further two minutes.
  • With a large metal spoon, add the sifted dry ingredients and fold in very gently in two batches.
  • Transfer the batter into a greased and lined sponge roll tin with deep sides and bake 15-20 mins or until it is lightly golden and springs back when you press the surface lightly
  • If you have the nerve, some bakers recommend dropping the sponge on the bench just after cooking, which apparently prevents the sponge from deflating and keeps it light (I didn’t and they still turned out fine). Turn the sponge out onto a wire rack and let it cool completely before coating it (see raspberry coating recipe above).

Notes

  • *You can keep the cake for a day before actually making the lamingtons, making the cake not so soft and easier to handle.
  • **You can store lamingtons (without the cream) in a sealed container in the refrigerator for several days. Lamingtons would last in the freezer for 2 months at least.

Nutrition

Calories: 134kcalCarbohydrates: 24gProtein: 4gFat: 3gSaturated Fat: 1gPolyunsaturated Fat: 1gMonounsaturated Fat: 1gTrans Fat: 0.01gCholesterol: 74mgSodium: 103mgPotassium: 85mgFiber: 1gSugar: 15gVitamin A: 117IUVitamin C: 0.01mgCalcium: 45mgIron: 1mg
Keyword Raspberry lamingtons
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Susan, AKA Kiwicook
About The Author
Susan, also known as the Kiwi Cook, hails from Levin, New Zealand, and has a unique Kiwi-Dutch-British heritage that influenced her culinary upbringing. As an artist, tutor, writer, and editor, Susan dedicates her weekends to creating delectable dishes. Her food philosophy embraces moderation and listening to her body's needs.

Comments

  1. 5 stars
    Since moving to NZ my kids have fallen in love with these and are sad they don’t sell them in the states. They will be so glad that you shared this homemade version, and I have a feeling it will taste better than the store bought kind!

    Reply
  2. 5 stars
    Yum! Your lamingtons look amazing! I love the look of the shredded coconut and their beautiful colour! Thank you for participating!

    Reply
  3. 5 stars
    Thanks for much for the two recipes for the sponge cake. I love the idea of the raspberry Lamingtons, I never know you could use jelly to coat the Lamingtons that is a great idea.

    Your Lamingtons look so dreamy, wonderful for a brunch.

    Lovely work on this challenge.

    Yours Audax in Sydney Australia.

    Reply
  4. 5 stars
    Your Lamingtons look delicious Susan! I’m looking forward to trying this version as soon as possible, speaking as someone who also loves Lamingtons. I’ve only just discovered them so I have a lot of catching up to do eating them! 🙂 Can’t wait to try your raspberry jelly version – thanks for sharing! 🙂

    Reply
  5. 5 stars
    These look absolutely delicious Susan! Love your photo and congrats on also completing this month’s Daring Kitchen Bakers Challenge also!

    Reply
  6. 5 stars
    We do actually have these in the USA but they are called Zingers and they are still my favorite! Sold in most grocery stores. Not saying they are as good as homemade though

    Reply
  7. Tried the first lamington recipe . i thought it had so many eggs and not much cornflour … But gave it a shot. It rose up and looked good but deflated to 2cm… Looks like baked lemon tart inside… Yellow dense custard…

    Didn’t work.. Wasted those eggs. Can’t upload a picture.

    Reply
    • Hi Lisa. Thanks for letting me know – I’m really sorry it didn’t work for you. The recipe you used was the official recipe provided by The Daring Kitchen at the time. However, as I mention on the blog, I used the second recipe which worked well for me. Given your feedback, I will take off the first ‘official’ recipe as I can’t personally vouch for it, and keep the one I used.

      Reply
    • Hi. I prefer lamingtons to be gluten free and I love the light, fluffy texture when made with corn flour. While most recipes these days make a traditional sponge with part wheat/part corn flour, you can still find some classic recipes which are based on whipped eggs and corn flour – my personal favourite.

      Reply
  8. 5 stars
    Your lamingtons are lovely I’m wondering if you have a recipe for a ginger fluff sponge , it is to die for , thankyou, John mc allister

    Reply

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